The Other 9/11: remembering the neoliberal coup in Chile

by Jerome Roos on September 11, 2012

Post image for The Other 9/11: remembering the neoliberal coup in Chile

Today it is 39 years ago that Pinochet launched a bloody CIA-assisted coup against the democratically-elected socialist President Allende of Chile.

On September 11, 1973, General Augusto Pinochet and his right-wing supporters in the Chilean military and government staged a brutal coup d’etat that overthrew the democratically elected and socialist-leaning administration of Salvador Allende.

They did so with substantial assistance from the Nixon administration and the CIA, which had been supporting anti-socialist forces throughout Chile following the election of Allende in 1970 and his efforts to nationalize some key industries including the phone company, whose majority owner was the U.S.-based International Telephone and Telegraph (ITT).

Following the coup — in which tens of thousands were arrested and imprisoned in Chile’s football stadiums, untold numbers were tortured, executed, or “disappeared,” and Allende shot himself inside the presidential palace following his farewell speech — the Chicago Boys who had been trained in Friedman’s brand of neoliberalism, previously rebuffed in the 1970 election, were now suddenly given the keys to the Chilean economy by the Pinochet regime.

This came on the heels of a proposal published on the day of the coup by the Chicago Boys to restructure Chile as a kind of laboratory of neoliberalism.

During the airforce bombardment of the Presidential palace, La Moneda, Allende addressed the nation one final time. These were Allende’s famous last words, delivered after personally engaging in a bitter hours-long firefight with Pinochet’s treasonous military forces, and just moments before taking his own life with a rifle given to him as a gift by Fidel Castro:

Surely, this will be the last opportunity for me to address you. The Air Force has bombed the antennas of Radio Magallanes. My words do not have bitterness but disappointment. May there be a moral punishment for those who have betrayed their oath: soldiers of Chile, titular commanders in chief, Admiral Merino, who has designated himself Commander of the Navy, and Mr. Mendoza, the despicable general who only yesterday pledged his fidelity and loyalty to the Government, and who also has appointed himself Chief of the Carabineros [paramilitary police]. Given these facts, the only thing left for me is to say to workers: I am not going to resign!

Placed in a historic transition, I will pay for loyalty to the people with my life. And I say to them that I am certain that the seeds which we have planted in the good conscience of thousands and thousands of Chileans will not be shriveled forever. They have force and will be able to dominate us, but social processes can be arrested by neither crime nor force. History is ours, and people make history.

Workers of my country: I want to thank you for the loyalty that you always had, the confidence that you deposited in a man who was only an interpreter of great yearnings for justice, who gave his word that he would respect the Constitution and the law and did just that. At this definitive moment, the last moment when I can address you, I wish you to take advantage of the lesson: foreign capital, imperialism, together with the reaction, created the climate in which the Armed Forces broke their tradition, the tradition taught by General Schneider and reaffirmed by Commander Araya, victims of the same social sector who today are hoping, with foreign assistance, to re-conquer the power to continue defending their profits and their privileges.

I address you, above all, the modest woman of our land, the campesina who believed in us, the mother who knew our concern for children. I address professionals of Chile, patriotic professionals who continued working against the sedition that was supported by professional associations, classist associations that also defended the advantages of capitalist society.

I address the youth, those who sang and gave us their joy and their spirit of struggle. I address the man of Chile, the worker, the farmer, the intellectual, those who will be persecuted, because in our country fascism has been already present for many hours — in terrorist attacks, blowing up the bridges, cutting the railroad tracks, destroying the oil and gas pipelines, in the face of the silence of those who had the obligation to act.

They were committed. History will judge them.

Surely, Radio Magallanes will be silenced, and the calm metal instrument of my voice will no longer reach you. It does not matter.  You will continue hearing it. I will always be next to you. At least my memory will be that of a man of dignity who was loyal to his country.

The people must defend themselves, but they must not sacrifice themselves. The people must not let themselves be destroyed or riddled with bullets, but they cannot be humiliated either.

Workers of my country, I have faith in Chile and its destiny. Other men will overcome this dark and bitter moment when treason seeks to prevail. Keep in mind that, sooner rather than later, the great avenues will once again be opened through which free man will pass to build a better society.

Long live Chile! Long live the people! Long live the workers!

These are my last words, and I am certain that my sacrifice will not be in vain, I am certain that, at the very least, there will be a moral lesson that will punish felony, cowardice, and treason.

Santiago de Chile,
11 September 1973

The BBC made this documentary, The Other 9/11, about the coup. Don’t mind the sometimes dreadful choice of music; the film is actually the only full-length English-language documentary that interviews people from both sides, and provides a number of fascinating insider accounts of the coup that was to unleash the era of neoliberalism onto Latin America and the world:

{ 5 comments… read them below or add one }

Conor Scott September 11, 2012 at 23:00

I object to calling Pinochet a “neo-liberal”. There is nothing “liberal” about murdering 2500 of your opponents and imprisoning thousands more!

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Mark B September 12, 2012 at 09:39

But that is all part of the neo-liberal agenda, as can be borne out in the atrocities that have followed both what happened in Chile and 9/11 in the US. Many thousands, perhaps hundreds of thousands have perished and millions suffered nder the actions of the politics and military of the US and it’s allies, all dancing to the tune of the capitalist puppetmasters.

I think you are confusing left-leaning ‘liberal’ politics with the ‘neo-liberalisation’ of trade and international law as well as global financial deregulation that has resulted in the disenfranchisation and subjugation of workers and self-determining communities, who have then suffered because of the failings of the greedy corporate banking elite.

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Conor Scott September 12, 2012 at 18:25

I still think there is a difference between pro-capitalist policies in a democracy and pro-capitalist policies under a dictator. I know that Thacher (whom many describe as a “neo-liberal”) endorsed Pinochet because of his free market economic policies and his helping Britain during the Falklands war, but she was just being an ignorant, stupid old witch! Sensible conservatives should be able to see that the brutality of the Pinochet regime was unacceptable, regardless of his economic policies. Personally, I do not consider myself a “conservative” by the way!

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AHP September 13, 2012 at 00:34

There are no bounds to what capitalism will do. The morality is formed by capitalism. Capitalism reminds me of the intelligent extra-terrestrial river being in Tarkovski’s ‘Solaris’.

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Steven Frans September 28, 2012 at 11:50

Remember this footnote in Marx’ Capital vol. I: “Capital is said by a Quarterly Reviewer to fly turbulence and strife, and to be timid, which is very true; but this is very incompletely stating the question. Capital eschews no profit, or very small profit, just as Nature was formerly said to abhor a vacuum. With adequate profit, capital is very bold. A certain 10 per cent. will ensure its employment anywhere; 20 per cent. certain will produce eagerness; 50 per cent., positive audacity; 100 per cent. will make it ready to trample on all human laws; 300 per cent., and there is not a crime at which it will scruple, nor a risk it will not run, even to the chance of its owner being hanged. If turbulence and strife will bring a profit, it will freely encourage both. Smuggling and the slave-trade have amply proved all that is here stated.” http://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1867-c1/ch31.htm#15a

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